The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, takes care of a 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the Stranding Center, the team rescue the turtle, named "Tiki", from an entanglement in the waters off Dam Neck, in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, takes care of a 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the Stranding Center, the team rescue the turtle, named "Tiki", from an entanglement in the waters off Dam Neck, in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

 A rope had pinched off the circulation to her right flipper.

A rope had pinched off the circulation to her right flipper.

 Wendy Walton, Lisa Wright, and Christina Trapani with the Stranding Response Team care for the 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the stranding center.

Wendy Walton, Lisa Wright, and Christina Trapani with the Stranding Response Team care for the 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the stranding center.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team
Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team
 Wendy Walton with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response next to Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle as the turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 

Wendy Walton with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response next to Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle as the turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 

 Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

 Photograph of what is called a turtle crawl, it's hard for a sea turtle to sneak onto shore to nest, they weight upwards of 150 pounds. Since their legs are made for swimming the best they can do on land is a belly flop and crawl. The tracks they leave are quite distinctive. This crawl appeared at Back Bay national Wildlife Refuge were a nest was found.

Photograph of what is called a turtle crawl, it's hard for a sea turtle to sneak onto shore to nest, they weight upwards of 150 pounds. Since their legs are made for swimming the best they can do on land is a belly flop and crawl. The tracks they leave are quite distinctive. This crawl appeared at Back Bay national Wildlife Refuge were a nest was found.

 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs on the beach at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge before being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs on the beach at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge before being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

014.jpg
 Patrick Hegge, was an intern with Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, here he works to help move a loggerhead nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Patrick Hegge, was an intern with Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, here he works to help move a loggerhead nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

016.jpg
 Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge moved a loggerhead sea turtle nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge moved a loggerhead sea turtle nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

 Loggerhead sea turtle breaks through the surface of the sand at the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle breaks through the surface of the sand at the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge nursery site behind the dunes.

 Volunteers help biologist move Loggerhead Sea Turtle hatchlings down to the water edge at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, after the turtles hatched from the nursery site behind the dunes.

Volunteers help biologist move Loggerhead Sea Turtle hatchlings down to the water edge at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, after the turtles hatched from the nursery site behind the dunes.

 No. 62 half out of the sand, completely upright as it makes it way out from under the sand after 60 days at the nursery site on the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 61 loggerhead turtles had hatch ahead of it, now the small turtle would start it's beach crawl and 40 mile swim offshore.

No. 62 half out of the sand, completely upright as it makes it way out from under the sand after 60 days at the nursery site on the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 61 loggerhead turtles had hatch ahead of it, now the small turtle would start it's beach crawl and 40 mile swim offshore.

  I have worked with the Bay Back biologists, who help protect local sea turtle populations, for the last two years. Each season, they monitor nests along the Virginia coastline. When Tropical Storm Hanna threatened a Loggerhead sea turtle nest in the Sandbridge part of Virginia Beach, the biologists decided to excavate the nest. There were over 20 hatchlings under the sand, which were released immediately. Hatchlings usually emerge during the night. Previously, I had only photographed them using red filters. This time I enjoyed the rare opportunity of photographing them in daylight. Here one makes it way to the ocean.

I have worked with the Bay Back biologists, who help protect local sea turtle populations, for the last two years. Each season, they monitor nests along the Virginia coastline. When Tropical Storm Hanna threatened a Loggerhead sea turtle nest in the Sandbridge part of Virginia Beach, the biologists decided to excavate the nest. There were over 20 hatchlings under the sand, which were released immediately. Hatchlings usually emerge during the night. Previously, I had only photographed them using red filters. This time I enjoyed the rare opportunity of photographing them in daylight. Here one makes it way to the ocean.

 Tattoo of a loggerhead sea turtle on the leg of Christina Trapani, Assistant Stranding Response Coordinator of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Program.

Tattoo of a loggerhead sea turtle on the leg of Christina Trapani, Assistant Stranding Response Coordinator of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Program.

 Dead sea turtle found on the beach in the sandbridge section of Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Dead sea turtle found on the beach in the sandbridge section of Virginia Beach, Virginia.

  During the necropsy of an endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle, a small piece of latex balloon was found. Released balloons and other ocean debris can be harmful to wildlife when ingested or entangled.

During the necropsy of an endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle, a small piece of latex balloon was found. Released balloons and other ocean debris can be harmful to wildlife when ingested or entangled.

 Members of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team take measurements of a dead turtle found on the beach, the turtle most likely died from a boat strike.

Members of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team take measurements of a dead turtle found on the beach, the turtle most likely died from a boat strike.

 The CT scan of Wolverine, an injured loggerhead sea turtle being rehabilitated at the Virginia Aquarium in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The scan took place, at the Sentara Independence Advanced Imaging Center in Virginia Beach. The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team wanted to check the extent of the turtles injury.

The CT scan of Wolverine, an injured loggerhead sea turtle being rehabilitated at the Virginia Aquarium in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The scan took place, at the Sentara Independence Advanced Imaging Center in Virginia Beach. The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team wanted to check the extent of the turtles injury.

   This x-ray was taken of a loggerhead sea turtle that had an apparent boat strike to the head.  After many neurological issues and nine months of rehabilitation, "Crack Head Fred" was released back into the wild with a satellite transmitter and is apparently doing well.

This x-ray was taken of a loggerhead sea turtle that had an apparent boat strike to the head. After many neurological issues and nine months of rehabilitation, "Crack Head Fred" was released back into the wild with a satellite transmitter and is apparently doing well.

  A turtle named Robin Leech being help by Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, a lethargic and emaciated loggerhead covered with barnacles and leeches, found floating in the Hampton River.  The turtle died shortly after this photo was taken.

A turtle named Robin Leech being help by Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, a lethargic and emaciated loggerhead covered with barnacles and leeches, found floating in the Hampton River. The turtle died shortly after this photo was taken.

  Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, treat Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, with antibiotics at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, treat Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, with antibiotics at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

  Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, help feed Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia,

Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, help feed Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia,

 Crush of Ares a Loggerhead sea turtle at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia takes a look as the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team prepare some of the turtles that have been rehabbed at the center for release.

Crush of Ares a Loggerhead sea turtle at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia takes a look as the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team prepare some of the turtles that have been rehabbed at the center for release.

 The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team weighing a Loggerhead sea turtle that was rehabbed at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and is ready for release.

The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team weighing a Loggerhead sea turtle that was rehabbed at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and is ready for release.

 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.

 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. 

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. 

 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.

 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released a rehabilitated sea turtle into the Chesapeake Bay.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released a rehabilitated sea turtle into the Chesapeake Bay.

 The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, takes care of a 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the Stranding Center, the team rescue the turtle, named "Tiki", from an entanglement in the waters off Dam Neck, in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
 A rope had pinched off the circulation to her right flipper.
 Wendy Walton, Lisa Wright, and Christina Trapani with the Stranding Response Team care for the 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the stranding center.
Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team
 Wendy Walton with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response next to Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle as the turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 
 Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.
 Photograph of what is called a turtle crawl, it's hard for a sea turtle to sneak onto shore to nest, they weight upwards of 150 pounds. Since their legs are made for swimming the best they can do on land is a belly flop and crawl. The tracks they leave are quite distinctive. This crawl appeared at Back Bay national Wildlife Refuge were a nest was found.
 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs on the beach at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge before being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
 Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
014.jpg
 Patrick Hegge, was an intern with Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, here he works to help move a loggerhead nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
016.jpg
 Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge moved a loggerhead sea turtle nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.
 Loggerhead sea turtle breaks through the surface of the sand at the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge nursery site behind the dunes.
 Volunteers help biologist move Loggerhead Sea Turtle hatchlings down to the water edge at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, after the turtles hatched from the nursery site behind the dunes.
 No. 62 half out of the sand, completely upright as it makes it way out from under the sand after 60 days at the nursery site on the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 61 loggerhead turtles had hatch ahead of it, now the small turtle would start it's beach crawl and 40 mile swim offshore.
  I have worked with the Bay Back biologists, who help protect local sea turtle populations, for the last two years. Each season, they monitor nests along the Virginia coastline. When Tropical Storm Hanna threatened a Loggerhead sea turtle nest in the Sandbridge part of Virginia Beach, the biologists decided to excavate the nest. There were over 20 hatchlings under the sand, which were released immediately. Hatchlings usually emerge during the night. Previously, I had only photographed them using red filters. This time I enjoyed the rare opportunity of photographing them in daylight. Here one makes it way to the ocean.
 Tattoo of a loggerhead sea turtle on the leg of Christina Trapani, Assistant Stranding Response Coordinator of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Program.
 Dead sea turtle found on the beach in the sandbridge section of Virginia Beach, Virginia.
  During the necropsy of an endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle, a small piece of latex balloon was found. Released balloons and other ocean debris can be harmful to wildlife when ingested or entangled.
 Members of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team take measurements of a dead turtle found on the beach, the turtle most likely died from a boat strike.
 The CT scan of Wolverine, an injured loggerhead sea turtle being rehabilitated at the Virginia Aquarium in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The scan took place, at the Sentara Independence Advanced Imaging Center in Virginia Beach. The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team wanted to check the extent of the turtles injury.
   This x-ray was taken of a loggerhead sea turtle that had an apparent boat strike to the head.  After many neurological issues and nine months of rehabilitation, "Crack Head Fred" was released back into the wild with a satellite transmitter and is apparently doing well.
  A turtle named Robin Leech being help by Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, a lethargic and emaciated loggerhead covered with barnacles and leeches, found floating in the Hampton River.  The turtle died shortly after this photo was taken.
  Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, treat Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, with antibiotics at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
  Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, help feed Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia,
 Crush of Ares a Loggerhead sea turtle at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia takes a look as the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team prepare some of the turtles that have been rehabbed at the center for release.
 The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team weighing a Loggerhead sea turtle that was rehabbed at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and is ready for release.
 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.
 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. 
 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.
 Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released a rehabilitated sea turtle into the Chesapeake Bay.

The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, takes care of a 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the Stranding Center, the team rescue the turtle, named "Tiki", from an entanglement in the waters off Dam Neck, in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

A rope had pinched off the circulation to her right flipper.

Wendy Walton, Lisa Wright, and Christina Trapani with the Stranding Response Team care for the 325 pound Green Sea turtle at the stranding center.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team

Wendy Walton with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response next to Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle as the turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 

Tiki, a 325 pound Green sea turtle is released on the beach of the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Photograph of what is called a turtle crawl, it's hard for a sea turtle to sneak onto shore to nest, they weight upwards of 150 pounds. Since their legs are made for swimming the best they can do on land is a belly flop and crawl. The tracks they leave are quite distinctive. This crawl appeared at Back Bay national Wildlife Refuge were a nest was found.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs on the beach at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge before being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle eggs being move to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Patrick Hegge, was an intern with Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, here he works to help move a loggerhead nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge moved a loggerhead sea turtle nest to the Back Bay nursery site behind the dunes.

Loggerhead sea turtle breaks through the surface of the sand at the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge nursery site behind the dunes.

Volunteers help biologist move Loggerhead Sea Turtle hatchlings down to the water edge at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, after the turtles hatched from the nursery site behind the dunes.

No. 62 half out of the sand, completely upright as it makes it way out from under the sand after 60 days at the nursery site on the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 61 loggerhead turtles had hatch ahead of it, now the small turtle would start it's beach crawl and 40 mile swim offshore.

I have worked with the Bay Back biologists, who help protect local sea turtle populations, for the last two years. Each season, they monitor nests along the Virginia coastline. When Tropical Storm Hanna threatened a Loggerhead sea turtle nest in the Sandbridge part of Virginia Beach, the biologists decided to excavate the nest. There were over 20 hatchlings under the sand, which were released immediately. Hatchlings usually emerge during the night. Previously, I had only photographed them using red filters. This time I enjoyed the rare opportunity of photographing them in daylight. Here one makes it way to the ocean.

Tattoo of a loggerhead sea turtle on the leg of Christina Trapani, Assistant Stranding Response Coordinator of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Program.

Dead sea turtle found on the beach in the sandbridge section of Virginia Beach, Virginia.

During the necropsy of an endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle, a small piece of latex balloon was found. Released balloons and other ocean debris can be harmful to wildlife when ingested or entangled.

Members of the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team take measurements of a dead turtle found on the beach, the turtle most likely died from a boat strike.

The CT scan of Wolverine, an injured loggerhead sea turtle being rehabilitated at the Virginia Aquarium in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The scan took place, at the Sentara Independence Advanced Imaging Center in Virginia Beach. The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team wanted to check the extent of the turtles injury.

This x-ray was taken of a loggerhead sea turtle that had an apparent boat strike to the head. After many neurological issues and nine months of rehabilitation, "Crack Head Fred" was released back into the wild with a satellite transmitter and is apparently doing well.

A turtle named Robin Leech being help by Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, a lethargic and emaciated loggerhead covered with barnacles and leeches, found floating in the Hampton River. The turtle died shortly after this photo was taken.

Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, treat Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, with antibiotics at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Wendy Walton and Maggie Cook with the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team, help feed Atlantis, a loggerhead sea turtle in their care, at the stranding center in Virginia Beach, Virginia,

Crush of Ares a Loggerhead sea turtle at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia takes a look as the Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team prepare some of the turtles that have been rehabbed at the center for release.

The Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team weighing a Loggerhead sea turtle that was rehabbed at the Virginia Aquarium Marine Animal Care Center, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and is ready for release.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. 

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released three rehabilitated sea turtles today, into the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. Two loggerhead sea turtles and one Kemp's ridley were released.

Virginia Aquarium Stranding Response Team released a rehabilitated sea turtle into the Chesapeake Bay.

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